Theme by maraudersmaps.
"Monolinguals often assume that this kind of switching happens because speakers are not competent in one of their languages - a sort of deficit hypothesis - or because a concept just can’t be expressed in one of the languages - a sort of lexical gap explanation. Analysis of recorded multilingual speech doesn’t support these ideas, however. Speakers who code-switch the most often are usually those who are the most fluent in both of their languages, and there are linguistic rules about where in a sentence a switch can happen."

Van Herk, What Is Sociolinguistics, chapter 11. (via transliterations)

The Wikipedia article on code-switching has a nice classification of the types and linguistic rules involved: 

  • Intersentential switching occurs outside the sentence or the clause level (i.e. at sentence or clause boundaries). It is sometimes called "extrasentential" switching. In Assyrian-English switching one could say, “Ani wideili. What happened?” (“Those, I did them. What happened?”)
  • Intra-sentential switching occurs within a sentence or a clause. In Spanish-English switching one could say, “La onda is to fight y jambar." ("The in-thing is to fight and steal.”)
  • Tag-switching is the switching of either a tag phrase or a word, or both, from one language to another, (common in intra-sentential switches). In Spanish-English switching one could say, “Él es de México y así los criaron a ellos, you know.” (“He’s from Mexico, and they raise them like that, you know.”)
  • Intra-word switching occurs within a word itself, such as at a morpheme boundary. In Shona-English switching one could say, “But ma-day-s a-no a-ya ha-ndi-si ku-mu-on-a. (“But thesedays I don’t see him much.”) Here the English plural morpheme -s appears alongside the Shona prefix ma-, which also marks plurality.


(via allthingslinguistic)

counterpunches:

hetagarnet:

qichi:

linguisticsyall:

Where does your tongue stay when you’re not speaking? If you’re an English-speaker, it’s behind the top front teeth. If you’re a Russian-speaker, it’s on the bottom of your mouth, lying flat.

#what #for real

I JUST FREAKING CONSCIOUSLY CHECKED AND TRIED TO MAKE IT LAY FLAT BUT NO, IT’S SERIOUSLY AT THE TOP OF MY MOUTH. I DON’T LIKE THIS

 

162,685 notes
11/09/14 @ 11:48am
pumpkinskull:

blood-and-vitriol:

what about y’all’d’nt’ve

beautiful

pumpkinskull:

blood-and-vitriol:

what about y’all’d’nt’ve

beautiful

1,823 notes
21/08/14 @ 02:38am

science-of-noise:

linguisten:

transliterations:

Me: “I wanna dedicate my life to languages”
Me: *puts minimal effort into actually learning languages*

Study linguistics, and the contradiction is gone. ;-)

Yes, you too can know a lot about languages while knowing virtually no languages.

354 notes
18/06/14 @ 06:45pm
allthingslinguistic:

xkcd 1383: Magic Words
Hovertext: “And then whisper ‘anapest’ in my ear as you hold me”?
"Story water paper doorway" is a series of trochees (strong-weak)"Disarm Adele’s giraffe grenade" is a series of iambs (weak-strong)"Strawberry scorpion poetry" is a series of dactyls (strong-weak-weak)
And then trochees, iambs, dactyls, and anapests (weak-weak-strong) are all types of metrical feet. (The word “anapest” is itself a dactyl though.)

allthingslinguistic:

xkcd 1383: Magic Words

Hovertext: “And then whisper ‘anapest’ in my ear as you hold me”?

"Story water paper doorway" is a series of trochees (strong-weak)
"Disarm Adele’s giraffe grenade" is a series of iambs (weak-strong)
"Strawberry scorpion poetry" is a series of dactyls (strong-weak-weak)

And then trochees, iambs, dactyls, and anapests (weak-weak-strong) are all types of metrical feet. (The word “anapest” is itself a dactyl though.)

10,656 notes
11/06/14 @ 04:34pm
33 notes
30/05/14 @ 04:08pm
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koreanmodel:

Jennifer Koch at Christopher Raeburn Fall 2012 LFW